Session A (Sat. AM) 9:30 am – 10:45 am

A1  How do we define, and find, our Queer voices in drama?

ROOM TBA

Hubert Brard has been an educator for the past 20 years having taught junior kindergarten to grade twelve.. Hubert is presently the arts instructional coordinator focusing on creativity, innovation, craftsmanship with growth mindset. He was an instructor for the Honour Specialist Music Education AQ at YorkU, is an instructor for Diversity in Schooling at BrockU and, Education Law/Policy at UOIT. After completing two Masters degrees in assessment and, policy, Hubert is a doctoral candidate at the OISE/UT studying Queer identity narratives, social identities with school leadership in Ontario schooling.

WITHIN an Queer-based equity lens, this project expands the equity pieces specifically focusing on Queer rights (via gender identity and sexual orientation) via drama (elements of drama) and the creative process (as an inquiry paradigm). The conceptual understanding of the Brecht technique is used here to invite the students move to action pertaining to Queer-based social justice actions/advocacy. While looking at Queer-based social justice and equity issues, students are asked to take note (be self-aware) when creating scenes, the reasons for their scenes (the acknowledgement of their choices when developing scenes) and thinking of the emotional connections of their scenes. Further, their scenes are to prompt the students to take action in respects to their acknowledgement of local Queer equity issues and take action (via advocacy) at the school (and local) levels. This workshop will review educational policies (see Bill C-13) and Queer rights legislations (see PPM 119).


Best Panel/s: Secondary Drama

A2  Exploring Identity Through World Dance

ROOM TBA

Sashar Zarif is a multi-disciplinary performing artist, educator, and researcher whose artistic practice invites a convergence of creative and cultural perspectives.  His interests are identity, globalization, and cross-cultural collaborations. His practice is steeped in the artistry and history of traditional, ritualistic, and contemporary dance and music of the Near Eastern and Central Asian regions. For the past 25 years  he has toured over 30 countries across the Americas, Europe, North Africa, Central and Western Asia, and Middle East, promoting cultural dialogue through intensive fieldworks, residencies, performances, and creative collaborations. In 2011, he received the honorary titles of Master of Dance from Uzbekistan State Institute of Choreography in Tashkent as well as Honorary Faculty Member at this institute. In 2010 and 2014 he received Chalmers Fellowships for the Arts.  In 2012, Sashar Zarif was awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. 

THIS introductory workshop aims to provide students with a hands-on opportunity/experience to investigate the human experience in migration/refugee experience, displacement and integration/placement on a personal, historical, and/or reflective level – and to draw a parallel between the reality of the self and the other. The “other” reality will be explored through an introduction to the cultures and arts of Islamic Societies focusing on Central and Western Asian regions as well as Middle East and North African regions.  It will include a dynamic integrated performing arts practice/investigation of Dance, Music, Poetry, and Calligraphy. The residency also aims to bring awareness to the element of acceptance v.s. tolerance embedded in Sufi and Shamanic cultures of these regions. The “self” reality will be explored via student improvisation and creative movement exercises. The parallel between the self and other will be explored through a collaborative choreographic process.


Best Panel/s: Secondary Dance

A3  TBA

ROOM TBA

TBA 

TBA


Best Panel/s: TBA

A4 Dancing to Learn

ROOM TBA

Arwyn Carpenter, OCT, aims to champion dance classes for students of limited means, for new Canadians, for non-English speakers, for boys/men, and for dancers of all body shapes and abilities. She believes the transferable skills achieved through dance include improved physical control and awareness, keener perception in relationships and interactions, and a greater sense of well being. She holds an MFA in Dance from NYU’s Tisch School and teaches for the TDSB. She offers regular movement workshops for non-dancers and will perform in a new work by Carol Anderson in the Prince Edward County Jazz Festival in August 2017. 

THIS 3-part session will include:

1- Screening of Arwyn Carpenter’s short film “Dancing to Learn Better” documenting her dance program at TDSB’s Model School, Perth Avenue

2- Discussion of the research, following Grade 4, 5 & 6 students in their year of dance classes and their creation of group works that reflect their voices, concerns and hopes on the subjects of racism and inclusion

3- Creative physical session where participants will be guided in the creation of their own short social justice-based choreographic solos or group works, as a guide to a creative process that they can use later with students or as a personal artistic tool


Best Panel/s: Elementary Dance

A5 Assessing Through the Lens of Equity

ROOM TBA

Timea Szoboszlai is a teacher with the Peel District School Board and a graduate of the Queen’s Artist in Community Education program. Holding qualifications in dramatic arts, English, ESL, special education, social sciences and visual arts, she uses a cross-curricular approach to engage her students. Timea has also worked extensively with English Language Learners (ELLs), both as a formal instructor of ESL courses and as a lead teacher for after school programs in support of international students. Most recently, Timea has been developing curriculum resources for the new ADA2OL and ADA3OL summer school courses offered by the PDSB.  She was an ELL herself when she moved to Canada at age eight—an experience that continues to drive her commitment to building equitable practices for the 21st century classroom.  Currently, Timea is the Climate Lead of her school’s Bullying Prevention and Restorative Practices Committee. 

ASSESMENT drives instruction, but what should drive assessment in the 21st century? As our schools continue to see more international students, refugee groups and immigrant populations, educators are faced with the exciting—albeit challenging—task of creating learning spaces that are optimally inviting and equitable for all. In this workshop, we will explore assessment through the lens of equity and examine possible barriers and solutions to assessing English Language Learners in the drama classroom. Delegates will have a chance to partake in immersive inquiry as they examine various practical tools and strategies for use in both the ESL and mainstream drama classrooms. Tools will be provided for each stage of the assessment process, be it diagnostic, formative or summative in nature. By the end of the session, a clear correlation will emerge between equitable assessment practices, data validity and student engagement in the creative process.


Best Panel/s: Elementary & Secondary Drama

A6 The Four Breaths

ROOM TBA

Elder John Rice (Chippewa of Rama): Zahgausgai/Mukwa Dodem, is an Ojibwa/Anishinabeninni and a 3rd Degree member of the Three Fires Midewiwin Society from Wasauksing First Nation near Parry Sound, Ontario. John is a student of the Miikaans Teaching which is an Anishinaabe teaching about the Spirit’s journey through this physical realm and the mind’s adjustments to physiological and experiential events. He adds this expertise to the Early Psychosis Intervention Team at Canadian Mental Health Association in Barrie, Ontario and the Enaahtig Outreach Team in Orillia, Ontario. His past work experience includes work such as: Part time lecturer at Georgian College – Barrie, the Coordinator of Aboriginal Spiritual Services at the Mental Health Centre in Penetanguishene and Elder/Healer to Aboriginal inmates at the Fenbrook Institution near Gravenhurst, Ontario.  John, along with Dr. Ed Connors and Debby Wilson Denard, is one of the founders of Feather Carriers: Leadership for Life Training which is a pilot, community-based approach using traditional, cultural teachings as life promotion/premature death (suicide) prevention.

THE Creator used the duality in creating her grandchildren. Humans are spirit beings in physical form. How then, does the spirit enjoy Mnobamaadisiwin? (The Good Life) John’s session describes the need for the spirit to “breathe” and how the spirit enjoys life through the 5 senses and the 5 metaphysical senses. Traditional Healing songs are 4 verses long and this session examines these four breaths as a way of maintaining balance in life. This session ends with a Round Dance.


Best Panel/s: Secondary Dance

A7 The Pedagogy of the Oppressor: A Workshop in Ideological Diversity through Drama

ROOM TBA

Franco Saccucci: As an educator, writer, and wanna-be academic, Franco Saccucci’s areas of interest lie at the nexus of drama, transformation, identity politics, and queer pedagogy. Franco has worked for Camp fYrefly (an LGBT arts program at the University of Alberta), in youth HIV/AIDS education, at LGBT community centres, as a high school drama teacher, and now as a researcher at OISE/University of Toronto examining the pedagogy of the oppressor/oppressed through drama. Franco’s current research and writing continually ask the questions: How can the powerful and the oppressed live and create together in a multi-faith, multicultural Canada? Why and how does drama work in the transformation of ideology? .

I N the rise of social justice education, many students with immense privilege have rejected what it means to be “anti-oppressive”. This workshop will draw on research in ‘pedagogy of the oppressor’ and ‘theatre of the oppressed’ to ask: how we can use drama pedagogically, to create a space where multiple ideologies (progressive, conservative, anti-theistic, faithful, etc) co-exist? How do we navigate a drama classroom with queer, homophobic; and yet, racist, and racialized students? Specifically, we will:

  1. Utilize drama as a meditation and communication tool to work with competing ideologies in the classroom
  2. Create “community” in a drama classroom, that has students with both oppressive values, and anti-oppressive values
  3.  Utilize dramatic techniques to help students understand how power, privilege, and compassionate kindness operate in understanding each other’s identities and ideologies.

Best Panel/s: Secondary Drama

Contact Us

Conference Co-Chairs
Cameron Ferguson
Liz Burnip

Pin It on Pinterest